allthestrings said: Is that a moa?

Nah that’s the Brachiosaurus skeleton that is out front of the museum!

Last image is not mine… I couldn’t find the photographer but the original picture is off the blackhawks nhl website.  Hockey season is around the corner and the jersey will be up soon so I’ll get a shot of my own just as a keepsake when that happens :).

Night n Day

Going through stacks of things collected today,  And on many instances, I’ll see this scientific publication on trilobites that dates back to 1944.

In the last few years the Field Museum renovated and consolidated its entire pinned insect collection into the one space it is currently in.  But immediately before undergoing its renovations, there was so much material in that space that they advertised to the rest of the museum certain objects and publications that could be taken otherwise face the trashcan.  I remember the counter top being covered in various publications and collecting materials.  And somehow this publication was among all the stacks of mostly The Coleopterist.  I grabbed a couple of those and various other things from when I went down there.  But this one always remains separated from the rest of the stuff.  And I’m never really sure where to put it.

I usually trash these mistake images… but I found this one interesting enough to keep.  
Collections, and I think people in general like to keep the perfect stuff.  Photo albums seldom contain sad photos unless the context of remembering is sad.  Anyway I thought this was an interesting perspective i don’t usually dwell on often.  And I’m getting into the idea of things getting in the way of other things in some of my images. 

I usually trash these mistake images… but I found this one interesting enough to keep.  

Collections, and I think people in general like to keep the perfect stuff.  Photo albums seldom contain sad photos unless the context of remembering is sad.  Anyway I thought this was an interesting perspective i don’t usually dwell on often.  And I’m getting into the idea of things getting in the way of other things in some of my images. 

Allie and I have been spending some extended after hours in the museum the last few days.  One of these days Allie came across these crazy guys.  From the family Nymphalidae and the genus Catoblepia.  It isn’t unusual for this species to have brush-like hairs on the hindwings but this one specimen’s hindwings were all crazy and poofy.  She thinks they’re males and that these hairs are for detecting female pheromones.  But if anyone knows for sure, tell us!

Allie is an imaging specialist like me but for the insect collection.  She’s working on tropical butterflies and has already finished an imaging project for the Field Museum’s Chicago butterfly identification guide ipad/iphone app.  She’s going to start her own tumblr called Between Two Floors for the work she does in the museum and you can expect a lot of collaborative posts from us when that is up and running!  She has one tumblr blog started: threadfullyyours!  Check it out!

Lastly I just wanna remind everyone that I started a facebook component!  I’ll try to get my photos and projects organized there for easy viewing!  That’s slow goin though.  But at least it’s there as an option.  I should definitely do more photographing other people’s desks in the museum.

So as I said in my last post… this amazing structure.  If you follow wefuckinglovescience on tumblr or facebook, you saw this featured not long ago.  When I was in school and first discovering just how amazing natural history sciences are, I came across this amazing scientist by the name of Walter R. Tschinkel.  He studied ant colonies and nests by creating aluminum casts of the colonies.

http://www.core77.com/blog/architecture/walter_tschinkels_aluminum_casts_of_ant_colonies_reveals_insect_architecture_23607.asp

Never in my entire life did I expect I would get to see one in person, and here I am carrying it by hand to my office!!!  Dr. Corrie Moreau (as seen in this brainscoop) has once again helped me fulfill another one of my bucket list things.  She’s the reason I’ve been able to image so many cordyceps that I spammed onto tumblr for that short period of time.  

This beautiful sculpture is the colony structure of the red imported fire ant: Solenopsis invicta.  It’s an invasive species that is all over the US and considered a great pest so it was more than alright for Tschinkel to pour molten aluminum into the nest to create this study sculpture.  In this miniature pompeii, you can see in the close up images the black specks that are actually the impressions of the ants that used to inhabit the nest.

Other casts that Tschinkel has worked on, for local ant colonies, he will wait until the colony has moved out before doing this.  So don’t worry, not all of these beautiful sculptures have such a devastating effect on the critters.  According to Corrie, Tschinkel’s knowledge of ants and their nests is so astute that he can look at a cast and tell you the species of the ant that created it.  Each ant species has it’s own unique architectural qualities adding yet another layer to understanding communal species of insects.

I still can’t get over the fact I photographed this today.  Included the scale bar pic for those who like that. Also wanted to note it’s upside down technically so hold your phone upside down to view the correct orientation.  Dr Moreau’s portrait with her favorite thing is due very soon.

I have

something so super duper insanely cool on my desk today!!!!! I’ll post later desk.  Night or day sometime…

Soooo creepy… For real though

Soooo creepy… For real though

13” triple exposure
&
2
5”
Exposures